• Linda Marquez Goodine

Do You Have Bloating, Burp Up, and Digestive Issues? Low Stomach Acid & How To Test.

Updated: Sep 24, 2019


Eating is supposed to be enjoyable. Most gatherings and celebrations involve food and eating. But if every time you eat, you feel horrible, that’s a clue that something is off-balance with your digestive tract.


Millions of people feel this way, so you are not alone.


Have you heard of hypochlorhydria (also known as low stomach acid)? Some of the common symptoms are:

  • Burping

  • Bloating

  • Nausea while taking supplements

  • Gas

  • Diarrhea

  • Hair loss

  • Intestinal infections


What causes this?


Age

The stomach produces less acid as we age.


Stress

Stress impacts the production of stomach acid and chronic stress will contribute to hypochlorhydria.


Bacterial infections

H. Pylori short for Helicobacter pylori is a bacteria that affect more than 50 percent of people around the world.


Medications

Over the counter medications and antacids can effect the production of stomach acid. Prescribed proton pump inhibitors (Prilosec, Prevacid, Nexium, Protonix, Dexilant) often used to treat acid reflux can cause hypochlorhydria.


Low Zinc Levels

Zinc is required for stomach acid production, therefore, low levels can contribute to hypochlorhydria.


Does this sound like you?


Check out this video and do the baking soda test at home. It’s inexpensive, but you shouldn’t rely on this only. Some people prefer the Heidelberg test, a medical diagnostic test used to diagnose hypochlorhydria. The average cost is about $350 and must be done in a doctor’s office.


The Baking Soda Test


In a nut shell, upon rising, drink a cold glass of water (about 4-6 ounces) with ¼ teaspoon of baking soda and time how long it takes to produce a strong hearty belch. If it takes more than three minutes, there is a good chance you have low stomach acid. You can repeat this three consecutive mornings to confirm your findings.


If it takes more than three minutes to get a hearty belch, adding a hydrochloric acid supplement before meals can be helpful. Don’t do this if you have ulcers and always consult with your doctor first.


Find your dosage by starting with one tablet of HCL (500 mg -750 mg) with pepsin. Take with your meals containing protein (at least 20 grams) and increase dosage until you feel a burning sensation as you increase the dose. When you feel a burning sensation, reduce dosage by one tablet and you have found your dosage. So, if at four tablets you feel a burning sensation, then three tablets is your dosage. Anytime you feel a burning sensation, you are probably one tablet over on your dosage and can reduce it at your next meal.


References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4991651/

https://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v20/i36/12809.htm

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/145855.php

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* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information or products mentioned are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your physician before starting any new dietary regime or use of any these products.

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